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Paternity Testing When Two Possible Fathers are Brothers or Related

Jul 30, 2018 | Blog, DNA test, Paternity, Paternity Test

Paternity testing when two possible fathers are related

It’s not unusual for a customer to tell us there are two possible fathers for a child and that those two fathers are biologically related. Although two possible fathers who are related don’t share all their DNA (unless they’re identical twins), they do share enough that getting conclusive results for paternity testing may be problematic. So can paternity-test results under these conditions be trusted? Yes! Here are some relationship possibilities and how they may affect test results.

If Possible Fathers are Brothers

It’s important to remember that, although they are closely related, full brothers each have very DNA profiles that are still quite distinct from each other. The chances of two brothers who are not identical twins matching a child at each genetic marker for paternity testing are not likely. But since the relationship between possible fathers is so close, we still recommend that each of the men test with the child, if possible. At the very least, it’s essential to notify the lab that there are two possible fathers and that they are brothers. The lab can then test more genetic markers, if necessary. It’s also important to include the child’s mother’s DNA in testing. When you include the mother’s DNA, it helps analysts to more easily determine which data is coming from the possible father and which is coming from her.

If Possible Fathers are Twins

Fraternal Twins

If the men are fraternal twins, the DNA connection between them is the same as it would be for “regular” brothers. As when “regular” brothers test, it’s best when both men can test and the mother should also contribute a DNA sample to strengthen paternity testing results (see If Possible Fathers are Brothers, above).

Identical Twins

For identical twins, their DNA is as you would expect: exactly the same! With today’s level of technology, this makes being able to genetically differentiate between the twins for paternity testing purposes practically impossible and completely cost-prohibitive since it would require testing most of their genetic markers instead of the standard 16.

If Possible Fathers are Father/Son

A full 50% of the son’s DNA comes from his father, so if these two men are the possible fathers for a child, there is a high possibility of obtaining a “false positive” result if only one of the men participates in testing. Therefore, the ideal is for both men to test with the child. If this isn’t possible for whatever reason, then the lab must be notified ahead of time (so that additional analysis can be conducted) and the mother should definitely send in her DNA sample as well.

If Possible Fathers are Cousins

Even men who are first cousins don’t share enough genetic material in common to cause a “false positive” for a paternity test: the connection is just too far removed to make a significant difference.

One Final Thought . . .

To repeat the most important points: In all cases where two possible fathers are closely related, it’s best if both men can test at the same time.  If there is a close genetic connection between possible fathers, and only one man can or is willing to test, it’s important to notify the lab about the biological relationship when submitting DNA samples: better safe than sorry!

Call us at 800-929-0847: We’re here to help.

87 Comments

  1. Ruth Ann

    I have a son who is almost 30 there is a possibility between 2 men, not related one is deceased the other is alive & well. Which is the best way to get a DNA test on the man that’s still here. Only thing is he lives in a different state?? Help please? Can it be done by mail?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Ruth Ann. The possible father living in a different state is no problem. We would just send testing materials to you and your son at your address and then send a kit to the man at his address. Just give us a call at 800-681-7162 during business hours.

      Reply
    • Jolene

      This is going to sounds terrible but I slept with identical twin brothers and within 24 hours .. The situation is so complicated and doesn’t really matter to my question..
      but now I want to find out who the true father is of my son. He’s 10 months old. I have access to one twin for DNA . Would my sample help if I only tested one twin? Is it even completely possible to find the TRUE father if I were to get BOTH of them to take the test? Is my sample important to the data?

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Jolene. Unfortunately, a paternity test won’t be able to determine which twin is the father, since the brothers’ DNA is virtually identical.

        Reply
    • Rowan

      If the fathers are brothers can conclusive results be had if only one of the males is tested?

      -Prenatal blood/swab method.

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Rowan. For prenatal testing, we cannot perform testing with two possible fathers who share a close biological relationship.

        Reply
  2. Sami

    My daughter had a dna test done and the results came back 99.96 but the other alleged father who is the other mans brother was not tested nor mentioned to the testing agency is there any possible way that the results could be wrong and his brother is in fact the child father?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Sami. In cases like this, a false positive may occur. It really depends on how much DNA the brothers happen to have in common at the locations tested. It’s essential that your daughter be tested again, hopefully this time with both men. If that’s not possible, then the lab definitely needs to be made aware of the other alleged father and his biological relationship to the man being tested BEFORE they do the testing.

      Reply
  3. Julia

    Two men get tested to determine the paternity of their daughter (they both think they are the father).
    After the tests, one of them is the father. Neither one of the men suspects they are related to each other. Let’s presume they are.
    Would the DNA test done to determine paternity inadvertently discover the relationship?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Julia. That’s an excellent question! It depends on how much DNA the two men share in common, whether they’re brothers or father/son, etc. What I’ve definitely seen a few times is this: a man is excluded as the father (meaning he’s not considered the biological father), but the lab made a notation in the report of the possibility that the actual biological father is related to the man who was tested.

      Reply
  4. DANI

    Hi, Both fathers in question are dead but my sisters father is the brother of the man I think is my dad. He is also dead.. Can I do a DNA TEST with my sister to see if our fathers are related.. We both have the same Mother.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Dani. Because you and your sister share the same mother, you already know you are half siblings and a test is not necessary to determine that. You may want to test with someone whom you are certain is related to your possible father in the first degree: like a known child of his. I suggest you give our experts a call so you can walk through your situation with them on a one-on-one basis and see what your options are: 800-681-7162.

      Reply
    • Anne-marie

      Me and my dad got a DNA test but there is a possibility that his brother might b my dad. The test come back saying he isn’t my dad but is there anyway we can determine if we are at least related in someway from the test result

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Anne-marie. The best way to answer that question definitively is to test the uncle, if possible.

        Reply
        • Marie

          My son and alleged father had a DNA testing done. Results came back he cannot be excluded as the biological father and it was 99.9987%. The alleged father believes he still is not the father since the other person did not test. There is no relation other than same ethnicity. Is another testing needed?

          Reply
          • DDC

            Hi, Marie. Unless the two men share a close biological relationship, then no, there’s no need for additional testing. 99.9987% is an extremely conclusive result.

  5. John

    Hi, what if the two potential fathers are half brothers ( they share the same mother but different dads), is it possible to accurately determine the father of the child if you only have samples from one of the half brothers?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, John. The answer is yes. However, two things are very important:
      (1) The mother of the child should be tested also
      (2) The lab must be notified ahead of time that another alleged father is the half-brother of the man being tested. This way, they can take this fact into account when doing their analysis.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • jenny

      Hi, how will i know if its my husband child can they used his brother sample as her kid and my husband sample to make a positive result? My husband is forcing to be the father but we don’t see any similarities of him and the child and the girl confessed that they were five men at same time when they mess up together.

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Jenny. Substituting the uncle’s DNA for the possible father’s is not likely to yield a positive result. To be safe, it would be wise to insist on a legal paternity test where DNA collection is witnessed and IDs are checked. I suggest you contact us directly to speak with an expert at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 8 pm Eastern).

        Reply
  6. Bob

    I am interested in clearing up the relationship between myself and sibling. I have a suspicion that my father and my siblings father were brothers (same mother) We are older and parents all deceased. Can this be definitively shown?
    Thank You

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Bob. Did either of you know your fathers?

      Reply
      • Steve

        Like Bob (Nov. 15 2018 above) my brother and I share the same mother. She is still living. The three of us have been DNA tested: mom and I via 23andme, and my brother by MyHeritage. We’re confused in that my brother and I only share (as per MyHeritage) 38.4% DNA. I thought we would share closer to 50%. Since our shared DNA percentage is much lower, could this mean we might have separate fathers, who were perhaps brothers? Or is this 38.4% in the realm of same parents?

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi, Steve. I talked to our Chief Science Officer personally about your question. He thinks that 38.4% if a little low, but it’s not out of the realm of possibility for two full brothers. It really just depends on what you inherited from both parents in the genetic lottery. It is possible that you had fathers who were brothers…have you asked your mother about this? If it is possible that the fathers were brothers, then doing a Y-STR test with you and your brother wouldn’t do any good, since the two fathers would also share the same Y chromosome. You could do a sibling vs. half-sibling DNA test (with your mother including her DNA) while notifying the lab ahead of time that there may be another alleged father who is the brother of your presumed father.

          Reply
          • Steve

            Thank you! Great information and so quickly. Will connect with my brother and maybe mother as well, however this could be a touchy topic. She would probably be up for another DNA test and I could just leave it at that. My brother and I are quite interested in finding out more. Again – thank you!

          • DDC

            Yes it might be a touchy topic, for sure. You’re welcome, and good luck. If you have any other questions, feel free to reach out again.

  7. Steven

    Hi, I have a couple of questions I thought hopefully you might be able to answer…1st if a DNA test came back only 97% probability, would that mean I’m the Father? And second my kids Mom & my mom are sisters, my mom had here tubes tied before I would have been born. But just by some miraculous chance my mom did conceive me after that, which would obviously make my kids mother myself maternal cousins, what kind of result would you get?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Steven. I want to make sure I understand this correctly. Your kids’ mom is your maternal aunt?

      Reply
  8. Steven

    What blood types aren’t compatible without having the rh- shot?

    Reply
  9. Scott

    I have a question which I have gotten some conflicting answers on. The question I have is if my fathers brother (my uncle) is the other possible father of my child, is that a close enough relative to me to produce a false positive for me on the paternity test ? I already tested and got back the result of 99.99% with a CPI of 19,091. I am wanting to know if we are close enough relatives for it to affect the results of my test ? I would really appreciate your help on sorting this out. Thank you.

    Reply
  10. Anna

    I am not sure if the father or son is my child’s father. Will the paternity test be clear if only the father is willing to be tested and the son is actually the father?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Anna. Excellent question! This is very important: If only one of them can or is willing to test, you MUST let the lab know ahead of time that there is another possible father and what their biological relationship is. That way, the lab can take this into account in their analysis and test more genetic markers, if necessary, to obtain conclusive results. It’s also helpful for you to contribute your DNA to the test as well.

      Reply
      • Ann

        What will the DNA results show if I decide to just wait and get results with father being tested for paternity as the son has refused? Will the test results be negative or inconclusive if he is not the father?
        I have a suspicion that the son is actually my child’s father but I can proceed further if the results are not conclusive.

        Reply
        • DDC

          Ann, with today’s technology and methods, an accredited lab should never return an inconclusive result for a paternity test. When the father tests, it’s absolutely essential that you let the lab now ahead of time that the other alleged father is the son of the man being tested. That way, the scientists can take that info into account when doing their analysis. They can test additional markers, for example.

          Reply
  11. Juliet

    Hello! I been having this gut feeling ever since my ex took the DNA test about 3 years ago that he is the father, but when he did the test, the results came negative, and he was very upset, there is another guy who I am having a problem contacting him to also get the paternity DNA test, I even got him into child support JUST for him to do the Test! what are the chances if my ex takes a second DNA blood test but this time would be him, my son(9) and me? I mean how different the tests are compared to the swab, and only taken by the alleged father and child? And also having the same birth marks can prove the alleged father is the one? (meaning my ex) even though he already took the test and it came negative?
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Juliet. DNA collected via blood and via swab is exactly the same…one method is not more “accurate” than the other, in terms of results. If DNA for the same exact people who did the first test is submitted again for the second test, you can expect to see the exact same results, especially if you used an accredited and reputable lab like ours. A birth mark alone is not proof of biological relationship. All this being said, if you still have doubts, why not do another paternity test with your ex? I recommend doing a legal, witnessed test so that results can be used for court, if necessary.

      Reply
  12. Mo

    Hi,
    My husband was tested 21 years ago for a child with his ex. She(the ex ) also slept with his brother. Now the conclusion on the results said that my husband “can not be ruled out as” . what does that mean ? His brother has not been tested.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Mo. For the technology at the time, this was probably as conclusive a result as the lab was able to give. It means just that…your husband might be the father, or he might not. The lab could not say for sure that he’s not the father. Has he considered testing again, now that the technology is so much more improved? If he does, it’s essential that he tell the lab ahead of time that the other possible father is his biological brother. That way, the lab can take that information into account and perform additional testing, if necessary, to obtain a conclusive result.

      Reply
  13. Erik

    This is off my results papers,
    Conclusions of DNA Paternity Test
    Based on the genetic testing results obtained by PCR analysis of STR loci, the probability of paternity is 0.099% as compared to an
    untested, unrelated random man of the Caucasian population (prior probability = 0.5). Please note that 2 mismatches (at loci D21S11
    and D5S818) have been found in the comparison of the profiles between the alleged father and the child. Possible relationship
    scenarios are as follows:
    1. The Alleged father is not the biological father of the child or may be a possible relative of the biological father.
    2. The Alleged father is the biological father of the child but there is a double mutation in the Child.
    My questions are, if I have a 0.099% chance of being the biological father, why is it saying that I may be a possible relative? Just because of the other loci are matching? Is it fairly common for random people to have a lot of strings match? What are the odds/chance that a double mutation can occur?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Erik. Double mutations are not that unusual. I’m surprised the lab you used didn’t just take a little extra time to test additional genetic markers or include the mother in testing. Yes, because there are matches at all the other loci, that’s why they gave you the possibility of being a close relation (brother to the actual biological father, for example), although the chances of that are relatively small. Sounds like you need to contact the lab and ask questions about why they weren’t able to give you a more definitive conclusion.

      Reply
    • Tracey

      If I have had a 99.99999 positive test but then find out that my Mum and Uncle had an affair, could my uncle be my father? When I sent my results back, I didn’t know this information so didn’t inform the lab that there may be another brother involved!

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Tracey. You may want to perform another test, yes.

        Reply
        • Erik

          Me and an alleged father did a DNA paternity test few years ago and it came back negative. We do share DNA in 8 locations out of 15 (+ X,Y), in these locations:
          D3S1358,
          D2S1338,
          D16S539,
          D10S1248,
          D2S441,
          vWA,
          D8S1179,
          FGA.
          Here are locations that we don’t share:
          D19S433,
          D22S1045,
          D18S51,
          D1S1656,
          TH01,
          D21S11,
          D12S391.
          I’m wondering if we are related and how closely.
          I also did DNA testing with MyHeritage and one man shares 6,2% DNA with me that would make him my (paternal) great uncle or 1st cousin once removed or 2nd cousin. I contacted his sister (also through MyHeritage) and I’m pretty sure I figured out who could be my father by their family history/tree. I want to contact him but I’m terrified because he has no idea that he could be my biological father. My mother and alleged father were positive that they were my biological parents. I should ask this newly found alleged father to make paternity test but I don’t know how to approach him since he has his own family and quite high status job.

          Reply
          • DDC

            Hi, Erik. I cannot speak to results from ancestry companies, sorry. As for the paternity test you did, barring genetic mutations, you must match at every genetic locus tested in order for him to be considered your biological father. The fact that you share DNA in 8 locations means little and is not proof of a different type of biological relationship, like uncle or cousin. As humans, we all share a great deal of the same DNA: You and I probably match in many places. I wish you well with your search!

        • Eve

          How probable is it, that both brother would match at all 20 locations in a test with a child? I mean in average.

          Reply
          • DDC

            It is unlikely, but possible. I cannot provide an average for you.

  14. Vin

    Hello! i just want to know if its necessary to get additional paternity test when i get a conclusive result? ex. if i get additional 3 or more test is there a chance that the result came different from one another?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Vin. The results should be exactly the same for each test as long as the same DNA is submitted and the same ethnicity is stated. If you already got a conclusive result, you don’t need to do another anyway.

      Reply
  15. Grace

    Hello! Is it possible to get a conclusive result in paternity test if one of the participant have a mutation(s)?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hello, Grace. Analysts take mutations into account when doing their calculations plus they test additional DNA markers in order to obtain conclusive results.

      Reply
  16. Roger

    I want to know if dental fillings/pasta on teeths can affect the paternity results in any way? As far as i know fillings contains many chemical.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Roger. No, that’s not a problem and won’t affect results.

      Reply
  17. Adm

    If there is tow brothers (from the seam father and seam mother) and a Child. And we have test Only one of the brothers and the Child can be confirm this brother he is the father or not with out testing the other brother?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi. As stated in the article you’ve commented on, it’s best if both brothers can test, along with the child’s mother. If that’s not possible, it’s absolutely essential to let the lab know ahead of time about the other possible father and his relation to the man being tested. That way, the lab can take that knowledge into account when doing its analysis and extra DNA markers can be tested if necessary for conclusive results.

      Reply
  18. Sherry

    My boyfriend recently had a court ordered DNA test through DDC. The results came back as 99.9%. We also recently found out that the mother of the child may have (both parties deny this, but we’re suspicious) slept with his full brother around the same time of conception. Is it possible that the results were wrong? Also, is it possible to re-test the specimens?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Sherry. Brothers share 50% of their DNA only, so it’s unlikely that there was a “false positive” result. Yes, if indeed his test was done through DDC, since he did a legal test we can re-analyze the data, but keep in mind there is a fee for this service. Your boyfriend should call us at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern).

      Reply
  19. Sherry

    How much is the fee?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Sherry. A new legal test is $300-500, depending on where you live and other factors.

      Reply
  20. Jeana

    My sister and I have the same mother(she has passed) but our father might not be mine. It is possible his brother is. Is there a way to find out if my sister and I have the same father without involving either or the brothers(our dad and uncle). I want to know but do not want them to know. And my sister is willing to get tested with me.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Jeana. What you are seeking is a full vs. half-sibling test. It’s unfortunate that your mother has passed, since her participation would have greatly optimized your chances of getting conclusive results. You and your sister can do a test, but it’s absolutely essential to let the lab know ahead of time that the possible fathers are brothers. This way the lab can take this information into account when doing their analysis and test additional markers, if necessary. Adding other relatives like your mother’s sister would be helpful too, but without your mother being available, you might get conclusive results but then again you might not. It just depends on your shared genetic data.

      Reply
  21. Christy

    My moms sister and my dads brother had a child. I don’t believe my son is mine, I believe he may be my cousins. He will not take a test. So I’m asking if myself and my son took the test, would this be accurate? Could it be possible that our DNA is that similiar? Or No?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Christy. I’m confused by your name. Are you the mother of the child or the alleged father of the child?

      Reply
    • Terri

      I sent in child’s sample and 2 possible fathers samples in one envelope. The results have been posted and 1 shows as the father @ 99.999 but I was not given the name I provided on the envelope. Only a number for the sample. How do I determine which person is my father?

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Terri. If your test was with DDC, give us a call at 800-831-1906 (M-F, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm Eastern).

        Reply
  22. Danny

    Adding to my question above..
    Since I did a legal Non-Invasive prenatal test can DDC take another look at my results and see to make sure I couldn’t be a distant relative to the child? I am the only one who can be tested. or do we have to re-test..

    Reply
  23. James

    If alleged fathers are father and son. And one of them had a negative test result with the baby. Is it 100% that he is not the father for the child?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, James. Yes, it is.

      Reply
  24. Lou

    Hi if the alleged father is tested and he is a first cousin to the mother and the results say he is 99.99999999%, is this accurate? Will the mother and tested fathers relationship as 1st cousins affect the DNA results if the lab are unaware of this relationship?
    Thanks,
    Lou

    Reply
    • DDC

      No, a first-cousin relationship is not to worry about since they only share about 12.5% of the same variable DNA. We’re more concerned with a father/son, nephew/uncle, grandson/grandparent relationship. As stated in the article you commented on: “Even men who are first cousins don’t share enough genetic material in common to cause a “false positive” for a paternity test: the connection is just too far removed to make a significant difference.”

      Reply
  25. Ronald

    My ex wife told friends that my father is my son’s father not me, my has passed away and she refuses to be apart of any genetic testing, can i have both of my sons dna tested along with mine to find out?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Ronald. Yes, you can. Just be sure you specify your sons’ possible relationship with your dad when ordering the test. That way, we can keep that information front and center during the analysis and then test additional markers, if necessary. Call us for a confidential, no-obligation consultation at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 8 pm Eastern).

      Reply
  26. Lashawn

    My son and the alleged father was tested and the results came back “0” but I was never tested. Should I reconsider retaking the test so I can be tested as well. They have the same numbers on some of the markers

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Lashawn. Unless the lab requests it, your participation is not necessary. Because we’re human and we share a lot of the same DNA, it is not unusual for people to have some of the same data at different genetic markers. You and I probably do too! What’s most important in paternity testing is for there to be matches at all genetic markers. Sometimes there may be one or two mismatches due to genetic mutations, but those are taken into account during analysis.

      Reply
  27. Tina

    My mother had 2 possible fathers. Both of whom are deceased. My mother does not want to know who her bio father was. However due to medical history, I feel its important for me and my children to know who my grandfather is.

    Can I take a dna test with one of her possible paternal siblings to find out if he is my uncle? They do not share the same mother

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Tina. Yes, you can do an avuncular (aunt/uncle) test, but keep in mind that the chances of obtaining conclusive results would be much greater if your mother participated. This is further complicated by their being half and not full siblings. I suggest you contact our experts directly at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 8 pm Eastern).

      Reply
  28. Anonymous

    My ex took a test it came back less the 100% his brother is now taking a test would the rest of that percentage likely be the brothers

    I’m then mum so I know I make up for a part of it but I’m very confused one is older then the other I’m hoping that I can get the answers

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Anonymous. A probability of paternity for paternity test can never be 100% since DNA testing is based on statistics. So without also testing every other man in the world with the same racial background as your ex, the highest probability of paternity is 99.9%+. If the test show a probability of relationship of 99% or higher, then your sons are considered your ex’s biological sons.

      Reply
      • Anonymous

        In this scenario the father could be a son or his dad.
        There is a lady who we have always considered my half aunt (my grandfather’s daughter) but there was a chance she was my father’s daughter as well making her possibly my sister. My grandfather (when my dad was a teenager my dad’s father) had an affair with my dad’s girlfriend and she became pregnant with said lady. Both my grandfather and my father have passed now. How/who would we get tested to get the most accurate results?

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi! You didn’t mention whether or not the lady is willing to do DNA testing. If she’s not, then the issue is moot. If she does agree to testing, I suggest you contact our experts directly to determine how to best proceed. That number is 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 8 pm Eastern).

          Reply
  29. Catherine

    Hi, me and my dad where tested, with the 20 loci test. The result was 99.99999998% (matching on all locis) and the combined index was 6,582,606,282. My unce, who deceased, could theoretically also be the father.
    In your article it says “The chances of two brothers who are not identical twins matching a child at each genetic marker for paternity testing are not likely. ”
    With the numbers above given, could you give me an estimation of how probable it is, that my uncle could have been the father? It should be almoust impossible, right?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • DDC

      Almost impossible, yes.

      Reply
      • Catherine

        Thank you very much!
        Would it be possible to guess any percentage range? For ecample: Is the possibility less than 1% or more like less than 0,00001%

        Reply
        • DDC

          Without all the data, I cannot provide a percentage range, no. Sorry!

          Reply
  30. Rayven

    Hi, I have a daughter and she has 2 possible fathers, they are brothers as well. I had her july 8th and the conception date was October 16th and I slept with them both within the week though. I have to get a paternity test on the 22nd. I need to know. What will happen if the one that is getting tested isn´t her father and how much of a possibility is it for them both to have very close DNA..

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Rayven. Regardless of conception date or who you think the father might be, it’s ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL to let the lab know ahead of time that the other possible father is the brother of the man being tested. That way, they can take that information into account when performing the analysis and test additional genetic markers, if necessary. You should also contribute your DNA. Ideally, both men should be tested.

      Reply
  31. G

    My brother and I got tested to try and find out if my dad was actually my uncle or not, the results came back 99.78%
    Is that 0.12% anything I should worry about?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, G. Did you do an avuncular test or a paternity test? Your statement isn’t clear. I suggest you contact the lab where you tested to have your questions answered.

      Reply

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Holistic Prenatal Care: How Does a Gender DNA Test Affect Pregnancy?

Holistic Prenatal Care: How Does a Gender DNA Test Affect Pregnancy?

   A 2017 Swedish study found that 95.8% of women discussed gender with their partner before the ultrasound scan, and 57% of couples wanted to find out the gender of their baby. Parents initiated this discussion with midwives 46% of the time, while midwives initiated...

Is There Such a Thing as an Infidelity Gene?

Is There Such a Thing as an Infidelity Gene?

It’s only natural for someone who has been cheated on to ask why their partner was unfaithful. A handful of studies have suggested that genes and hormones may predispose some men and women to infidelity. So that begs the question: Is cheating genetic? Here’s a look at...

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