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Can I Do a DNA Paternity Test With the Father and Child Only?

Mar 10, 2017 | Blog, DNA test, Paternity, Paternity Test

A paternity test without the motherCan I do a paternity test without the mother?
DDC always recommends that the mother contribute her DNA sample to a paternity test. However, although her participation is recommended, it’s not required. If you are trying to decide whether or not mom should be part of testing, here are some sample scenarios that can help you make the best choice for your unique situation.

A Mother’s Participation can Help Strengthen Paternity Results

In the majority of cases, a paternity question can be answered with only the possible father’s DNA and the child’s But in some relatively rare instances, the mother’s DNA can help strengthen results.

Example 1:

A child gets 50% of their DNA from the biological mother and 50% from the biological father. Therefore, the child must match both parents at every single DNA marker. If the man being tested has only one mismatch with the child, it may be due to a natural mutation and may not necessarily mean he’s not the biological father. When the mother’s DNA is included in the test, this question can be resolved and conclusive results given.

Example 2:

If there are two possible fathers for a child and those fathers are biologically related (brothers, father/son, etc.), then it’s essential to include the mother’s DNA sample in order to strengthen results.

A Mother Who Participates Gets Guaranteed Access to Results

As a top DNA lab maintaining the highest levels of accreditation, DDC maintains a strict policy of confidentiality. Results can only be released to participants in the test, to their legal representatives (such as lawyers), or to the tested child’s legal guardian, if that child is a minor. Therefore, to guarantee quick access to test results, it’s a great idea for the mother to just submit her DNA too, even if it ends up not being needed to strengthen results.

If You’re Doing a Legal, Chain-of-Custody Paternity Test

In many cases, courts who order a paternity test require the mother to participate. Court-ordered tests are also called legal or chain-of-custody tests, wherein DNA collection and sample-submission to the lab are supervised by an approved witness.

 If the court requires the mother to participate in testing, then the test cannot be performed without her.

Call us at 800-929-0847: We’re here to help.

12 Comments

  1. Inetta

    How can I get a copy of a test done back in 2003?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Inetta. At-home test results are kept on file for one (1) year, and legal tests are kept on file for seven (7); so unfortunately we can’t help you because your test was performed 15 years ago.

      Reply
  2. JR

    Hello, My wife of 32 years recently had a nightmare where our infant son (now 24 yoa) was switched at a day care center for another child. Her insecurity was such she began to believe this to be true, in spite of there being no reason to doubt he is our child. Three months ago I sent my son’s and my samples to you and the result was as I predicted , with a 99.99997% probability of paternity, CPI of 4,107,875. That placated her for a while, but she recently saw a ten year old blog post from some geneticist at Stanford, who claimed he heard of a similar father / son test that was overturned with the inclusion of the mother. Her question is addressed by your claim ” A “motherless” test could require more extensive analysis to produce conclusive results, but the results are just as accurate as those of a standard paternity test.”, yet she needs a more definitive answer. Is it worth repeating the test with her included? Will it materially alter the confidence of your results? Can I just send her swabs in if we decide to go that route? Respond via email if possible? Thanks.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, JR. I will respond to you via email, upon your request.

      Reply
    • Jess

      Hi. Should a mother participate in y-str with her two sons who she believe may have the same father? Could any mutation the may occur between the conception of two brothers be determine by the Y-STR test in your lab? What if they both have the same father but the youngest received a gene mutation from the father, could you tell?

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Jess. A woman does not have a Y chromosome, therefore the participation of the mother does not add any value to this particular test. Any possible mutations are always taken into account during analysis.

        Reply
  3. Michelle

    Hi my husband had sleep with another woman and she had a baby… But she was also sleeping with his brother, and the brother took a DNA test and it came back 00.000% NOT THE FATHER… And I was wondering does my husband need to take a test to be sure the child is not his?please answer via Email Thank you

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Michelle. Yes, your husband does need to test also, and he needs to notify the lab of his biological relationship to the other man who was tested. If you want to discuss this further privately, you’re welcome to contact us privately on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DDCPaternity/

      Reply
  4. Brittany

    My baby’s father passed away. Her grandfather on his side took a DNA test without me but it was a paternity test instead of a grandparent test. The test came up negative. Could that be because he took the wrong test and I wasn’t tested as well?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Brittany. Unless customers specify that it should be a grandparent test, then the lab makes the assumption that it’s a paternity test. So it makes sense that you would have gotten an exclusion. You should definitely retest, specify that it’s a grandparent test, and contribute your DNA as well.

      Reply
  5. Jane

    I did not participate in the test because I didn’t think I needed to. The rest was 99.96% inclusion with a CPI of 2,000 and one mutation. Should I retake the test with my sample or can I trust the result?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Jane. You can trust your result.

      Reply

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