Blog

Dog DNA Testing, your Vet, and You—A Pet’s Dream Team

Aug 10, 2017 | Pets & Vets

Dog DNA Testing, your Vet, and You—A Pet's Dream Team

Dog DNA testing has become so much more accessible with today’s new technology. Cheek swabs for DNA collection are easier and less invasive than taking blood samples, and just as accurate. And the choices keep growing!

Dog DNA Testing Choices

  • Tests such as the Wisdom Panel determine what breeds a dog has in its background. This gives valuable information in predicting the adult size of a mixed-breed puppy, and possible genetic health conditions related to certain breeds. And besides, isn’t it fun to play Sherlock: What Breed is My Dog?
  • Breeders of purebred dogs often test for inherited diseases to avoid producing affected offspring. Puppy buyers can then have proof for the disease screening of their new pet
  • Breeders also test for inherited traits such as coat color and length, mustaches, beards, and eyebrows, and natural bobtails (as opposed to dogs who have their tails docked at 3-5 days of age)

But the ease of obtaining results doesn’t mean the results can be taken lightly. For example, if a dog’s test results show they are affected by the Degenerative Myelopathy mutation (DM), it will most likely develop that disease, which is a gradual degeneration of the spinal cord. Those results, and what they represent, are scary. What now? Run sobbing into the street? No one wants that.

Results of Dog DNA Testing are Not a Diagnosis

It is really important to consider this as a test result and not a diagnosis. The next step is consulting your veterinarian, if you haven’t already.

  • Involve your vet from the beginning by including them in the decision to test, and by forwarding the results of the test directly to them
  • Schedule a visit with your vet for an exam on the pet, and discuss the results with them
  • Ask questions about the possible implications on your pet’s future health. What should you expect, now that you have this knowledge?

Forewarned is forearmed, and knowledge is power. Your vet has the training needed to understand what the results mean for you and your dog. They have gone through an average eight years of school, maintain a veterinary medical license, and continue to keep up with new medical developments in the industry throughout their career: all because they care about your pet. Their job is to guide both animals and people through life together, with all the preventive care and medicine necessary.

The Tip of the Tail

So a partnership of DNA testing by DDC and veterinary medicine can only be a win for our pets. And you are the glue that brings it all together. By using resources such as DDC, and consulting the medical experts in your local veterinary office, you are taking an active part in a healthy life for your dog.

What You Need to Know about CNM in Labrador Retrievers

What You Need to Know about CNM in Labrador Retrievers

Every year since 1991, the Labrador Retriever has been recognized as the most popular dog breed in America. This delightful breed’s nearly-unfailing friendliness to all humans big and small, even temperament, prowess when hunting, and overall charm explains why they...

Facts about HNPK in Dogs

Facts about HNPK in Dogs

According to the AKC, 2020 marked the 29th year in a row that Labrador Retrievers were the most popular dog breed in the United States. And why not? Whether you prefer yellow, chocolate, or black, Labs make amazing family playmates, hunting companions, service dogs,...

New Breeds at Westminster Dog Show 2020

New Breeds at Westminster Dog Show 2020

Established in 1877, the Westminster Kennel Club is the oldest organization in the United States dedicated to the sport of purebred dogs. Every February at Madison Square Garden in New York City, more than 3,000 dogs compete in a variety of contests, including...

What Is Copper Toxicosis in Dogs?

What Is Copper Toxicosis in Dogs?

What is Copper Toxicosis in Dogs? Copper-associated chronic hepatopathy, or Copper Toxicosis (CT), is an inherited progressive metabolic disorder (genetic) or it can develop non-genetically, secondarily to a primary disease. In both types, accumulation of copper in...

0 Comments

Reach Us

Have questions or need assistance? Contact our team.

DNA Technology Park
1 DDC Way
Fairfield, OH 45014

Leave A Message