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Prenatal Paternity Testing: 5 Myths Debunked

Dec 28, 2017 | Paternity, Prenatal DNA testing

Prenatal Paternity Testing - 5 Myths Debunked 

Many new parents who have questions about paternity don’t want to wait till after the baby’s born to do at-home paternity testing. There are many reasons why it’s a good idea to do prenatal paternity testing, and the process is actually quite simple from beginning to end. Even though DNA testing of all types has become mainstream, there are still some myths remaining about prenatal paternity testing. Let’s debunk the five most common ones.


LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW A PRENATAL PATERNITY TEST WORKS >


MYTH #1: It Puts the Mother and/or Fetus at Risk

Before DNA prenatal paternity testing became the go-to test for paternity testing while pregnant, it’s true that some choices for testing could put the baby at risk. Collecting the baby’s DNA via amniocentesis, for example, is invasive and poses a slight risk for miscarriage. The same risk is present when doing a CVS (Chorionic Villus Sampling). Most doctors will not perform either of these procedures for paternity answers alone, and the tests are extremely expensive.

A Non-Invasive Prenatal Paternity Test presents absolutely no risk to either the mother or the unborn child.

MYTH #2: It’s Not Really Accurate

The test performed at DDC examines 2,688 SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) markers in the DNA to develop the data used to calculate whether or not the man being tested in the biological father of the fetus. If a man is the biological father, then probability of paternity percentages of 99% or higher can be expected. The technology has become so accurate that results of prenatal paternity testing from an accredited lab like DDC’s are accepted in a court of law.

Results are so accurate that a follow-up paternity test following the birth of the baby is not required.

MYTH #3: I Have to Wait Until Late in the Pregnancy to Test

With DNA prenatal paternity testing, free-floating fetal DNA from the mother’s plasma is analyzed and compared to the mother’s DNA profile. A woman used to have to wait until the 13th week of pregnancy to be tested, so that there was enough free-floating fetal DNA to establish the baby’s profile. Fortunately, that’s no longer true.

With today’s next-generation technology, this test can be performed as early as 8 weeks into the pregnancy.

MYTH #4: All Labs That Do This Testing are the Same

Absolutely not true! Although there are many low-cost labs out there who claim to provide accurate results, it’s wise to do some comparison-shopping. The DDC test is the only one on the market that has been validated and published. Check to make sure any lab you’re considering is fully accredited by AABB and other accrediting agencies. If that info isn’t on the company’s website, beware! The lab being accredited is only part of the equation. The court-admissible DDC prenatal paternity DNA test itself is the first and only one to be AABB-accredited. This means that only the DDC test maintains the AABB’s strict standards of accountability for prenatal DNA paternity testing, including analysis, PhD review, and documentation. That is a very big deal. Why trust such an important test to anyone else?

DDC analysis and testing processes set the gold standard in the industry for prenatal paternity testing.

MYTH #5: I Won’t Be Able to Afford It

When it comes to prenatal paternity testing, you really do get what you pay for. There are relatively “cheap” tests on the market, but they may be performed by labs that aren’t fully accredited or that include a “follow-up” post-paternity test to confirm results from the prenatal one. Prenatal testing does cost more than a postnatal test because of the more extensive analysis required to obtain conclusive results.

A quality lab offers payment plans to help make testing affordable.

Final Thoughts about a Prenatal Paternity Testing

Now that the most common myths have been debunked, hopefully your mind has been put at ease about the testing experience from beginning to end. Just be sure to choose a highly-accredited and respected paternity testing lab with years of experience and the best reputation in the industry. We understand this can be a difficult and stressful time, so our team of prenatal experts are caring, confidential, and knowledgeable. Feeling like your test is in good hands is priceless.

Don’t hesitate to call us at 800-929-0847: We’re here to help.

ORDER A PRENATAL PATERNITY TEST >

Do you have questions or comments about prenatal paternity testing? Share in the comments and we’ll answer.

 

39 Comments

  1. Vickie

    I have a question. How long before anyone that has used this service got results. How many days

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Vickie. Once DNA samples have arrived at the lab, results are posted in as little as 3 business days. The range for results is 3-7 business days. The length of time depends on how much testing is required to obtain conclusive results.

      Reply
  2. JG

    My result came back that the alleged dad was NOT the dad. I tested right when my 8 week started. Had it been to soon & there wasnt enough DNA would the test be able to catch that or could it be why i got the result i got??

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, JG. I’ll assume you tested with us. Had there NOT been enough fetal DNA to get conclusive results, testing would have been suspended, results would not have been issued, and we would have let you know. We then would have scheduled another blood draw for you a few weeks later, in the hopes that more fetal DNA would be present. Since you were issued results, the samples were sufficient for testing and you can trust the results you were given.

      Reply
  3. Madison

    Hi I was wondering if you run the test twice for accuracy? Also my results show the paternity percentage was performed by netera is that your lab? And have you ever had anyone report a wrong result after birth? My results came back at 99.9% that the father is who I want it to be so I’m trying to put my mind at ease now

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Madison. Yes, Netera is the lab we partner with for non-invasive prenatal testing, and you can rest assured these results are accurate.

      Reply
  4. Rebecca

    When I received my results via email I did not receive a breakdown on how they came up with the results. Was I suppose too? Also I am happy with my results but still very nervous if I can trust them bc of some of the reviews I have read about DDC

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Rebecca. Tens of thousands of data points are analyzed for prenatal paternity, which is why a breakdown is not provided in this report like it is with a postnatal paternity test, which generally analyzes 16 loci. We are a highly-accredited lab and our processes are sound and trustworthy. You’re always going to read positive and negative comments about any lab, including DDC. We find that most negative reviews come from people who weren’t happy with their results. If you have any further questions about your test, you are more than welcome to reach out to our prenatal specialists at 800-303-9085.

      Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Rebecca. Thousands of data points are analyzed for prenatal paternity, which is why a breakdown is not provided in this report like it is with a postnatal paternity test, which generally analyzes 16 loci. We are a highly-accredited lab and our processes are sound and trustworthy. You’re always going to read positive and negative comments about any lab, including DDC. We find that most negative reviews come from people who weren’t happy with their results. If you have any further questions about your test, you are more than welcome to reach out to our prenatal specialists at 800-303-9085.

      Reply
  5. Julie

    Here recently has DDC had any inaccurate prenatal DNA results? I have my results and I am very pleased with them but super nervous they could be wrong.

    Reply
    • DDC

      You can trust your results. No worries!

      Reply
  6. Sandra

    If the child is a girl and the mother’s DNA is not available, what percent of accuracy would be required to differentiate between two potential fathers?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Sandra. In most cases, the mother’s DNA is not required to obtain a conclusive result. If one possible father is tested and the results show a 99% or higher probability of paternity, then the man tested would be considered the biological father and there would be no need to also test the other man. If the probability comes back 0%, then the other man should be tested.

      Reply
  7. Caterina

    How common is it that the mother’s BMI affectcs the amount of fetal DNA found in the blood sample? I am 5’4 and 300lbs I was 15 weeks when I had my blood drawn and the test came back as insufficient fetal dna for testing. I’ve ordered a second kit and I am now close to 18 weeks. What are the chances I will get the same results?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Caterina. Yes, what you are experiencing is actually quite common for people with higher BMIs, and you may experience it again with your next draw. Hopefully not!
      Here is a scientific paper about this very topic: http://bit.ly/2FPb2WQ

      Reply
  8. Lucy

    How many markers have to match to determine if the man tested is the father or not?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Prenatal paternity works differently than postnatal paternity; for our test we analyze over 2,000 SNPs.

      Reply
      • Lucy

        I did prenatal testing

        Reply
  9. Cristal

    I sent in a prenatal kit and it was negative results. I only slept with one other person during time of conceiving. I’m still nervous on how the results can be concluded as the man I tested was not the father. I pray the results is correct. I did not use DDC I used another prenatal testing site but I’m not sure if it is legit. My next option is waiting till I give birth in July to ask the hospital for a DNA test as soon as my daughter is born. I know all pregnancies are different but I feel this is similar to his first baby mother. Are all prenatal sites legit and if so are the results always 100 percent correct.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Cristal. I cannot speak to the accuracy of any other lab’s prenatal test results nor can I say that “all prenatal sites are legit.” That fact that you said you “sent in a prenatal kit” gives me pause, since prenatal testing requires a blood draw from the mother and that is done by a medical professional. Like with everything else, you do get what you pay for. For your own peace of mind, it may be wise to do another test after the baby’s born in July. All the best to you and your little one!

      Reply
  10. Deanna

    If the alleged father was excluded from the noninvasive paternity test should i have tested the other person?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Deanna. The test you did only answered the question of paternity for the man who was tested, yes. If you want to confirm someone else is the biological father, then additional testing would be needed.

      Reply
      • Deanna

        He is the only other possibility would it be necessary being that the first guy was excluded?

        Reply
        • DDC

          If you’re sure there’s only one other possibility, than no, you would not need to.

          Reply
  11. Deanna

    Also my report shows that my labs were done by Natera can I trust this??

    Reply
    • DDC

      Yes, Natera is our partner for non-invasive prenatal paternity testing.

      Reply
      • Deanna

        Yes I’m sure and thank you

        Reply
        • DDC

          You’re welcome!

          Reply
  12. Mj

    Can you please reassure me that my results are accurate? Have you had any tests in the past where the NIPP results were not the same after the baby was born? I got my results and am pleased as they were in my favor. Also the gender was accurate with the ultrasound but I just need to please put my mind at peace because my future really depends on this test.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Mj. If you tested with us, you can be sure your results are accurate.

      Reply
  13. Jill

    I recently did the non invasive prenatal paternity test through one of your partner companies who uses you for the lab. Since results are noterized can I trust them? I worry that I didn’t go directly through DDC but I called and it was confirmed they were a business partner. I got 0% so my worries are that the alleged fathers sample was only compared to my DNA and not the baby. Just worried due to false result reports on different websites from other woman. Thank you

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Jill. Even if you did your DNA collection through a business partner, keep in mind your test and the analysis were performed here at our laboratory. You can trust the results.

      Reply
  14. Lauren

    Does Natera analyze results for DDC my results state that parentage was determined by them.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Lauren. Great question! All testing is conducted at DDC, and we have a partnership with Natera to use their algorithm for calculating probability of paternity.

      Reply
  15. Kaley

    Hi,
    I got a 99.9% back that my boyfriend is the father, which I wanted. I’ve read on websites women have had false positives. I am just worried the results are wrong. I apologies. What are my chances of it being the wrong result? The gender came back correct confirmed by ultrasound. I am a mess and don’t want to go through this pregnancy saying it his and break his heart if its not.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Kaley. The only way a “false positive” can occur is if the woman also slept with a very close relation of the man being tested (say, his brother or father), and didn’t let the lab know of this possibility prior to testing. If the lab is told that the other possible father is a close relation to the man being tested, analysts can take this info into account and test additional markers, if necessary. Hope this helps!

      Reply
      • Kaley

        I know this probably not likely but what if it is his distant cousin? Would the test come back as a conclusion?

        Reply
        • DDC

          As distant cousins, they don’t share enough DNA to make any kind of difference. No worries!

          Reply
        • Kelly

          Was your test right Kaley?

          Reply

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