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Grandparent DNA Test: What You Need to Know

Mar 12, 2018 | Relationship

Grandparent DNA TestSometimes establishing paternity is not as easy as it sounds. If the possible father is simply not available for testing, a grandparent DNA test can be performed by a DNA testing lab with  experience in this type of analysis. The test shows whether or not a child is related to the grandparents—on the possible father’s parents’ side—and thereby helps to establish the identity of the child’s biological father. This same test can help determine maternity too, if needed.

Reasons to Take a Grandparent DNA Test

Many grandparents initiate this test because they are concerned that they might not be the actual biological grandparents of child/children! They are concerned, and simply want to know the truth. Being a grandparent requires emotional and financial support for many years, and if there is a question about the paternity of a grandchild, the grandparents want to know for sure. Aside from peace of mind, there may also be legal reasons for wanting to confirm a biological relationship.

Reasons to confirm paternity include:

  • Health concerns
  • Death of potential father
  • Custody issues
  • Heritage and inheritance concerns
  • Questionable paternity of child
  • Peace of mind

How It Works

Unlike a straight paternity test, this type of analysis is a bit more like putting together a DNA puzzle: when more participants contribute their DNA, the more pieces to the puzzle can be assembled to form a complete picture.
Who needs to provide DNA for a grandparent DNA test:

  • One or both parents of the possible father
  • The child
  • The mother of the child, if possible

The test is most accurate when there are two grandparents to test—both of the possible father’s parents. In the absence of one grandparent, the test can still be administered. However, it’s important to know the results may not be as conclusive as they need to be to establish paternity and/or maternity. If at all possible, the child’s mother should also participate to help strengthen the chances of obtaining conclusive results.
DNA is collected easily and quickly with simple, painless cheek swabs.
IMPORTANT:

  • If you need results for legal reasons (inheritance or immigration, for example), at-home testing is not an option. For court-admissible results, you must call the lab ahead of time to arrange for a legal, witnessed test
  • If you do not have legal authority to act on behalf of a minor child, the burden is on you to obtain all necessary consents before submitting the minor child’s DNA for testing

The Test Can Help to Protect Grandparent Rights

As a paternal grandparent, you really don’t know whether your grandkids are truly yours. Although you love and cherish each child, nothing can replace the reassurance you get from knowing for sure if those children are biologically related to yout. Fortunately, you now have the option to request a grandparent DNA test to learn the facts.
There may be some reasons why the child’s mother refuses to allow  a grandparent DNA test. In these cases, you may be able to petition the courts for the test to be administered.

Final Thoughts about a Grandparent DNA Test

Grandchildren are one of life’s greatest joys, but if you have any doubts about a biological relationship, it’s wise to ask some questions now in order to prevent a possible broken heart down the road. Contact us to make arrangements for a grandparent DNA test today. A kind, experienced representative from DDC will be happy to explain the details with a simple and completely confidential phone call.

Call us at 800-929-0847: We’re here to help.

Do you have questions about this topic? Leave them in the comments and we’ll answer!

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71 Comments

  1. Brandi

    My daughters dad (Bryan) is absent and 2 months ago my daughter (Kelsey) passed away she has a 4 month old son. Can there be a dna test done on Bryan’s parents and my daughters son to prove Bryan is his grandson my daughters dad. So it would be great grandson and great grandparents

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Brandi. Unfortunately, great-grandparent is too distant a relationship for this type of testing.

      Reply
    • Joann

      Hello
      My question is
      Grandmother and Granddaughter dna result is 3.4 % probability
      I really don’t understand it
      So I ask
      Is my granddaughter my grandchild or probably not my grandchild
      Your help in this matter would be much appreciated

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Joan. A 3.4% probability of relationship for a grandparent test is considered an exclusion; there is no biological grandparent/grandchild relationship.

        Reply
        • Ashley

          Hello
          How can I establish a home dna between my son and his grandfather. Where can i find the cost?

          Reply
          • DDC

            Hi, Ashley. Just give our team of experts a call at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 AM to 8 PM Eastern), and we’ll be able to provide price information and set up the test if you decide to do it.

    • T.

      How do I get somebody who’s incarcerated tested for a DNA test. It’s not for court . We just wanna know if he’s the father

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, T. You would need to ask the facility if they are willing to allow DNA tests. If they are, we can send testing materials directly there. Contact us at 800-929-0847 for a free consultation and expert advice.

        Reply
      • Dee

        My question is my mother tested her probably grandson and the result says 40% what does that mean. Is he related to us or not?

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi, Dee. That is considered an inconclusive result. Including the mother of the child in testing would really help to optimize the chances of obtaining conclusive results.

          Reply
      • Carla

        If a man is looking for his dad, would DNA from his grandmother be a factor in determining who the father is or would that have to come only from his grabdfather.

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi, Carla. It depends on what type of testing is going to be performed to help determine the relationship. The paternal grandmother’s DNA is helpful in doing an STR test with the man, especially if the man’s mother is also able to participate. Ideally, the paternal grandfather would also contribute his DNA to the STR test. If the test is Y-STR that analyzes the male Y chromosome passed down across generations through the male line only, then the grandmother’s DNA is not helpful.

          Reply
  2. Norma

    I want to know if I (grandmother) can compare my dna with my sons possible son and tell if he is the father. He is incarcerated now. Can work with the facility he is incarcerated to get his DNA?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Norma. Yes, we do grandparent testing all the time when a possible father isn’t available for testing. If the child is a minor, you would need consent from the child’s mother to test. In fact, it’s best if she contributes her DNA also. Some incarceration facilities permit paternity testing while others don’t. I suggest you contact us directly for a free confidential consultation at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 am to 8 pm Eastern).

      Reply
      • Nicole

        What percentage determines if a person is the grandparent with just the grandfather’s and child’s DNA?

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi, Nicole. In most cases, 90% or above is considered conclusive.

          Reply
  3. Tanya

    I need to find out if my grandson is My grandson without informing my son or the mother is this possible

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Tanya. If your grandson is a minor child, consent by a legal parent is required.

      Reply
  4. Nomandia

    Would like to know if my grandchild is mine father and mother died

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Nomandia. Call us directly for a consultation at 800-681-7162 (8 AM to 8 PM Eastern, M-F).

      Reply
  5. Michele

    Is 71.4% high enough for me to be sure the child is my grandchild. Only myself and child were tested

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Michele. That number is considered an inconclusive result, so the answer to your question is no.

      Reply
    • Camyriah

      It was a test done on me (the alleged grandma) and the child the percentage is 0.044 what does that mean? Can you explain ?

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Camyriah. That percentage is an exclusion, meaning you’re not related to the child tested.

        Reply
  6. Nicole

    Can CAS do grandparent DNA testing without the father? My husband and myself are fighting for custody of my grandson but I need to be sure I have rights To fight for him. My son isn’t in the picture as he is abusive.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Nicole. Yes, courts order grandparent testing for custody all the time when the possible father isn’t in the picture.

      Reply
  7. Kasey

    If an adult child wants to know who their father is but he isn’t willing to do a DNA test. Can his mother and father (grandparents) agree to a DNA test for the adult child?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Kasey. Yes, absolutely. DDC performs grandparent testing. For a free confidential consultation, contact us directly at 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 AM to 8 PM Eastern).

      Reply
  8. Angela

    My daughter baby and grandmother had one done. It can back 83%. Is her son the father

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Angela. That is considered an inconclusive result.

      Reply
  9. Venus

    Hi what will be the result of paternity testing if the grandfather takes as the father of his grandson coz he is adopted.needed by the son who is actually grandson for citizenship and passport application.thanks

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Venus. A grandfather only shares 25% of the same DNA as the grandson, whereas a father shares 50%. The two biological roles are not interchangeable. If the grandfather tests as the father, the result will be an exclusion.

      Reply
    • jessica

      so what is a conclusive test result percentage? I called and someone told me closer to 99 means they are related and less than 50 means they probably aren’t.

      Reply
      • DDC

        For a grandparent test, anything 90% and higher is considered conclusive.

        Reply
      • Jamie

        If a child and paternal grandmother were tested and the results came back as 25.2% does that mean the child is the biological grandchild? Or does it mean that perhaps they are related? Or should someone else be tested with the grandchild and grandparent?

        Reply
        • DDC

          Hi, Jamie. A probability of relationship of 25.2% for grandparent testing is considered an exclusion (not related). We always recommend that the mother of the child contribute her DNA too, in order to strengthen results. Ideally, both paternal grandparents would test + the mother + the child.

          Reply
  10. Monique

    Hi, alleged grandmother and daughter only done test, it came back 0.8% or 0.0089. What does that mean

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Monique. Do you mean grandmother and granddaughter, not daughter? That percentage of relationship is an exclusion, meaning there is no biological relationship.

      Reply
      • Monique

        Yes, granddaughter. So that would mean there would be no need for the alleged father to do a test then would it?

        Reply
        • DDC

          It’s always better if the alleged father tests instead of a grandparent, but you are correct.

          Reply
  11. Nick

    I suspect that my paternal and maternal grandparents are one in the same. I think my mother’s brother, my uncle, is my father. They both have always been sexual deviants. He has always wanted to be weirdly close to me. And a few days ago we were talking about his moles. He said when I get his age I will get them too, because I’m his. He said he meant because I’m his niece. My other 2 uncles have admitted he had sex with their half sister. Thank God I don’t have kids if this is true. Can a DNA test confirm my suspicions?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Nick. Because of the possibility of incest in this scenario, I suggest you contact our experts directly and consult on what the possibilities for testing might be. If you are in the United States, call 800-681-7162 (M-F, 8 AM to 8 PM Eastern). If not, you can start the conversation by emailing contact@dnacenter.com.

      Reply
  12. Carmen

    Hello my niece and my mom are being tested but the mother refuses to test because my brother wont say wether my nieces is his or not. What are the chances of my mom and my niece being related? Like what percentage can that give?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Carmen. For a grandparentage test, any percentage of 90% or higher is considered an inclusion.

      Reply
      • Carmen

        Will the percentage still be that high if the mother isnt tested?

        Reply
        • DDC

          That really depends on the genetic information for that individual test, but it’s always best if the mother can test too. The chances of obtaining conclusive results are much higher.

          Reply
  13. Bernadette

    I am the grandmother, supposedly my son is the baby’s father….can I do DNA test with the baby WITHOUT telling my son or the baby’s mother?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Bernadette. When DNA-testing a minor child, a legal parent’s consent is required.

      Reply
  14. Paula

    question I need to find out if my grandson is biologically my son kid either the the mother of the child or my son will establish paternity and i need it for custody reasons of my grandson so I was wondering if there is a way to establish paternity with just me grandmother and baby my grandson?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Paula. If the mother and your son don’t agree to DNA testing, you’ll need to consult with a family-law attorney to see what your options are for doing a grandparent test. We cannot perform testing on a minor child without the consent of a legal parent.

      Reply
    • Michelle

      My father passed away. The alleged grandfather passed away also. Can I test a half brother to my dad to see if I’m related to them?

      Reply
      • DDC

        Hi, Michelle. For this type of testing, a half-uncle is most likely not a viable testing partner to obtain conclusive results. I suggest you contact our experts directly so they can talk you through all your options: 800-929-0847 (M-F, 8 AM to 8 PM Eastern).

        Reply
  15. JJ

    My sons father is deceased. A paternity test was done between my son and the grandmother. It came back 13.6%, which was an inconclusive result. There are NO other possible fathers, so what do you recommend to solve this issue. Oh, and only the grandmother and child were tested.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, JJ. You can test again and include your DNA in the test.

      Reply
  16. Linda

    My Gbaby is 52.3%
    With a 1.1189 CRI
    WHAT does that mean

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Linda. That is an inconclusive result. Did you include the mother of the child in testing? That can really help to obtain more conclusive results.

      Reply
      • Linda

        No it was just me and the child

        Reply
        • DDC

          I suggest you include the mother if she is willing. Sometimes conclusive results can be obtained with just one grandparent and a child, but not always. It all depends on the genes you happen to share in common. Adding another grandparent and/or the child’s mother will yield a conclusive result.

          Reply
  17. Talonda

    Hi I took a grandparent DNA test. Only myself and the child was tested. The results were 78.2% is the child my grandson.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Talonda. That percentage is considered an inconclusive result, so it’s neither yes nor no. If possible, please include more participants in testing…especially the mother of the child.

      Reply
  18. Felicia

    Do an dna with my grandmother the results shows CRI 0.05 and probability of grandmother to child is 4.40% what means I don’t understand

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Felicia. Those number show an exclusion. In other words, you and your grandmother don’t share enough DNA to be considered biological relatives.

      Reply
  19. Angelina

    Hi, completed a DNA on myself and my potential grandson because my son and husband are no longer here. The results came back as 79.2% ( is this considered conclusive or inconclusive) please help.

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Angelina. That is an inconclusive result. To help strengthen results, it’s important to add the mother to testing if she is willing.

      Reply
  20. Tammy

    I’m the paternal grandmother and test results came back at 2.6% so does that mean were not related?

    Reply
    • DDC

      That is considered an exclusion, yes, so you are most likely not related.

      Reply
  21. Kasey

    I did a grandparent test with myself, my daughter and her grandmother the results came back as 0.00 and 0.19% I was not aware that I you should test both grandparents what does this mean?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Kasey. Testing both grandparents can often strengthen results. But since you participated, that helps tremendously too. The result you were provided is an exclusion, meaning your daughter and her grandmother do not share a biological relationship. Chances are that testing both grandparents would not have made a different to the outcome of this test.

      Reply
  22. Alexis

    I performed a test with my son, me, and his grandmother ( on his dads side). What is the percentage that I should be looking out for to be considered “related”?

    Reply
    • DDC

      Hi, Alexis. For single-grandparent testing, any percentage of probability higher than 90% is considered conclusive.

      Reply
      • Alexis

        Im just confused because i had performed a dna test with the father and it came back 99.999999% , but since he denied it the grandmother wanted tested ( me her and the baby) , but our results came up 80% which I know is inconclusive. Is that normal? Like i know hes the father.

        Reply

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